Unitek EMT’s Spotlight Series #3 EMT Training

Unitek EMT’s Spotlight Series #3

Unitek EMT’s Spotlight Series #3 EMT Training

You may have heard of the thin blue line or the thin red line, but have you heard of the gold line? There is a quote commonly found on inspirational signs, in pictures, and saved to various social media platforms. It says this: “Between the thin red line and the thin blue line lies the thinnest gold line. The gold line represents those who are rarely seen but mostly heard. The calm voice in the dark night. Dispatchers, the golden glue that holds it all together.”

In this third installment of the spotlight series, we’re going to take a closer look at police, fire, and ambulance dispatchers, and how they are the calm in the chaos. Our information comes directly from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). They are the principal federal agency responsible for measuring labor market activity, working conditions, and price changes in the economy.

Let’s start by delving into the definition of a dispatcher…

What Is a Dispatcher?

A dispatcher answers both emergency and nonemergency calls for people who need law enforcement, firefighters, ambulatory services, or a combination of the three. To some, they are also known as public safety telecommunicators.

Dispatchers have the difficult task of keeping a cool head under pressure, and providing stability and direction in stressful situations. According to the BLS,Dispatchers must stay calm while collecting vital information from callers to determine the severity of a situation and the location of those who need help. They then communicate this information to the appropriate first-responder agencies.”

Additionally, dispatchers often tell callers what to do before help arrives. Because of this, most dispatchers have been trained to deliver medical assistance over the phone. They might need to help the caller provide first aid while they wait, or they might need to instruct the caller on how they can remain safe. Throughout these calls, dispatchers keep detailed records of their conversations and log important facts.

What Does a Dispatcher Do?

The BLS lists the following as tasks typically performed by dispatchers:

  • Answer 9-1-1 emergency telephone and alarm system calls
  • Determine the type of emergency and its location and decide the appropriate response on the basis of agency procedures
  • Relay information to the appropriate first-responder agency
  • Coordinate the dispatch of emergency response personnel to accident scenes
  • Give basic over-the-phone medical instructions before emergency personnel arrive
  • Monitor and track the status of police, fire, and ambulance units
  • Synchronize responses with other area communication centers
  • Keep detailed records of calls

What Is the Work Environment of a Dispatcher?

Unitek EMT’s Spotlight Series #3 Work Environment

According to the BLS, “Dispatchers typically work in communication centers, often called public safety answering points (PSAPs). Some dispatchers work for unified communication centers, where they answer calls for all types of emergency services, while others may work specifically for police or fire departments.”

The work environment of a dispatcher can be stressful. Some may work long shifts, take numerous calls, and face troubling situations. During certain calls, they will be required to help people in life-threatening situations. The pressure to remain calm while responding quickly can be demanding.

Below is a breakdown for the biggest employers of police, fire, and ambulance dispatchers…

+ Local government, excluding education and hospitals: 80%

+ State government, excluding education and hospitals: 6%

+ Ambulance services: 6%

+ Colleges, universities, and professional schools; state, local, and private: 3%

+ Hospitals; state, local, and private: 2%

How Do You Become a Dispatcher?

So, just how do you become a dispatcher? Let’s start with education! The BLS states that “most police, fire, and ambulance dispatchers have a high school diploma. Many states and localities require dispatchers to have training and certification.”

Plus, candidates usually need to pass a written exam and a typing test. In some situations, applicants might be required to pass a background check. They might also need to pass tests for the following: lie detector, drugs, hearing, and vision. Experience with computers and customer service can be very helpful. Additionally, the ability to speak other languages—particularly Spanish—tends to be desirable in this occupation.

Generally speaking, the training requirements will vary by state. For instance, some states might require 40 or more hours of initial training, while others might require continual training every two or three years. Then there are some states that do not mandate any specific training. To learn more, the BLS recommends looking at the Association of Public-Safety Communications Officials (APCO International). There you’ll find a list of states that require training and certification.

The BLS also notes the following about dispatcher training:

“Training covers a wide variety of topics, such as local geography, agency protocols, and standard procedures. Dispatchers are also taught how to use specialized equipment, such as two-way radios and computer-aided dispatch software. Computer systems that dispatchers use consist of several monitors that display call information, maps, any relevant criminal history, and video, depending on the location of the incident.”

An Overview of Unitek EMT

While Unitek EMT does not offer dispatcher training courses, we do offer an accelerated EMT program! Experts in the EMS field educate our students through a combination of traditional learning, simulation training, and workshop-style classes. Additionally, we offer a program with several variations to better accommodate our students.

These variations include a 14-Day Boot Camp1 at our facility in Chandler, Arizona, and a Boot Camp at our Fremont Campus in Northern California. In California we offer AHA Basic Life Support (BLS) courses for professionals to learn or recertify for CPR, while others enhance their skillset with our Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) course.

Our Arizona students can attend American Heart Association (AHA) CPR courses or a stellar EMT Refresher course. This course is a combination of the traditional EMT Refresher—it includes all core material—and the NCCP National Registry 20-hour requirements, but it is presented in a 30-hour format. Additionally, a BLS course is also offered at the Chandler facility.

If you’d like more information, please contact us toll free at 888-790-1458.

Change your future with Unitek EMT!

 

 

1 Our 14-Day EMT Program in AZ and the 14-Day on-ground portion of the EMT Program in CA are taught in an intensive “boot camp” style, to simulate the fast pace of work expected on the job as an EMT. The California EMT Program also includes online instructional hours.

Unitek EMT’s Spotlight Series #2

Unitek EMT’s Spotlight Series #2

Unitek EMT’s Spotlight Series #2

“Service before self. These three words speak volumes about one’s personal beliefs, decision-making, and commitment to a specific cause.” An article by FireRescue Magazine delves into the firefighter’s oath and what it means to serve others. Upon entering the fire service, many firefighters take a version of this oath. In doing so, they promise to protect the community and commit to service before self.

At Unitek EMT, we recently started a series that sheds a light on EMS personnel. In this second installment, we’re going to take a closer look at firefighters. Our information comes directly from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). They are the principal federal agency responsible for measuring labor market activity, working conditions, and price changes in the economy.

Let’s start with the definition of a firefighter…

What Is a Firefighter?

According to the BLS, firefighters “control and put out fires and respond to emergencies where life, property, or the environment is at risk.” When responding to fires or other emergencies, the work can be very dangerous. When not at the scene of a fire, they are usually on call at fire stations, where they may eat, sleep, or perform other duties.

The BLS lists the following as tasks performed by firefighters:

  • Drive firetrucks and other emergency vehicles
  • Put out fires using water hoses, fire extinguishers, and water pumps
  • Find and rescue victims in burning buildings or in other emergency situations
  • Treat sick or injured people
  • Prepare written reports on emergency incidents
  • Clean and maintain equipment
  • Conduct drills and physical fitness training

How Do You Become a Firefighter?

Firefighters usually need a high school diploma as well as training in emergency medical services. As stated by the BLS, most firefighters undergo training at a fire academy, pass written and physical exams, complete several interviews, and produce Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) certification.

Below are a few other typical requirements for applicants:

  • Must be at least 18 years old
  • Must have a valid driver’s license
  • Must pass a medical exam and drug screening to be hired
  • May be subject to random drug tests after being hired and will need to complete routine physical fitness assessments

Why Should You Work as a Firefighter?

Like EMTs, firefighters perform an invaluable service and routinely save lives. Their occupation is a noble one, and it will always be necessary for the safety of the community. According to the BLS, employment of firefighters is expected to grow 7 percent by 2026.

Thanks to better building materials and building codes, there has been a substantial decrease in fires and related fatalities. However, firefighters will always be needed to respond to fires and medical emergencies. Because fires can spread quickly, it’s vital that they be controlled in as little time as possible. Additionally, wildland firefighters also fill a critical role.

A Day in the Life of a Firefighter

Another Look at Unitek EMT's Continuing Education Courses

A typical day is often unpredictable, as it greatly depends on the number and type of calls they receive. While on call at a fire station, firefighters often inspect equipment, perform practice drills, and occasionally eat or sleep. Their shifts usually last for 24 hours.

The BLS elaborates below:

“When responding to an emergency, firefighters are responsible for connecting hoses to hydrants, operating the pumps that power the hoses, climbing ladders, and using other tools to break through debris. Firefighters also enter burning buildings to extinguish fires and rescue individuals. Many firefighters are responsible for providing medical attention. Two out of three calls to firefighters are for medical emergencies, not fires.”

There are several different types of firefighters, too! The BLS mentions the following:

+ “Some firefighters may provide public education about fire safety, such as presenting about fire safety at a school.”

+ “Some firefighters also work in hazardous materials units and are specially trained to control and clean up hazardous materials, such as oil spills and chemical accidents. They work with hazardous materials removal workers in these cases.”

+ “Wildland firefighters are specially trained firefighters. They use heavy equipment and water hoses to control forest fires. Wildland firefighters also frequently create fire lines—a swath of cut-down trees and dug-up grass in the path of a fire—to deprive a fire of fuel.

They also use prescribed fires to burn potential fire fuel under controlled conditions. Some wildland firefighters, known as smoke jumpers, parachute from airplanes to reach otherwise inaccessible areas.”

An Overview of Unitek EMT

Are you interested in becoming an EMT or a firefighter? If you’re considering a career as a firefighter, you will likely need to obtain EMT certification first. At Unitek EMT, we offer an accelerated EMT program. Experts in the EMS field educate our students through a combination of traditional learning, simulation training, and workshop-style classes. Additionally, we offer a program with several variations to better accommodate our students.

These variations include a 14-Day Boot Camp1 at our facility in Chandler, Arizona, and a Boot Camp at our Fremont Campus in Northern California. In California we offer AHA Basic Life Support (BLS) courses for professionals to learn or recertify for CPR, while others enhance their skillset with our Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) course.

Our Arizona students can attend American Heart Association (AHA) CPR courses or a stellar EMT Refresher course. This course is a combination of the traditional EMT Refresher—it includes all core material—and the NCCP National Registry 20-hour requirements, but it is presented in a 30-hour format. Additionally, a BLS course is also offered at the Chandler facility.

If you’d like more information, please contact us toll free at 888-790-1458.

Change your future with Unitek EMT!

 

 

1 Our 14-Day EMT Program in AZ and the 14-Day on-ground portion of the EMT Program in CA are taught in an intensive “boot camp” style, to simulate the fast pace of work expected on the job as an EMT. The California EMT Program also includes online instructional hours.

Unitek EMT’s Spotlight Series EMT Training

Unitek EMT’s Spotlight Series

Unitek EMT’s Spotlight Series EMT Training

If you aren’t familiar with EMS, Emergency Medical Technicians (EMTs) perform a vital service by responding to emergency calls. They are often the men and women you’ll see in ambulances, where they treat injuries and save lives. They can be found in every state and in most locations. Without EMTs, countless people wouldn’t get the treatment they need.

At Unitek EMT, we’re starting a new series that sheds a light on various EMS personnel. In this segment, we’re taking a closer look at EMTs!

Let’s start with the basics…

What Is an EMT?

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), EMTs tend to the sick or injured in emergency situations. Because of this, “People’s lives often depend on the quick reaction and competent care provided by these workers. EMTs and paramedics respond to emergency calls, performing medical services and transporting patients to medical facilities.”

Once a 911 operator receives an emergency call and dispatches EMTs, they arrive at the scene in as little time as possible, often working with police, firefighters, and other first responders. The BLS lists the following as tasks typically performed by EMTs and paramedics:

  • Respond to 911 calls for emergency medical assistance, such as cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) or bandaging a wound
  • Assess a patient’s condition and determine a course of treatment
  • Provide first-aid treatment or life support care to sick or injured patients
  • Transport patients safely in an ambulance
  • Transfer patients to the emergency department of a hospital or other healthcare facility
  • Report their observations and treatment to physicians, nurses, or other healthcare facility staff
  • Document medical care given to patients
  • Inventory, replace, and clean supplies and equipment after use

How Do You Become an EMT?

Aspiring EMTs usually complete a postsecondary educational program. While the requirements vary by location, all states require EMTs to be credentialed.

The BLS says the following about EMS education: “Both a high school diploma or equivalent and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) certification typically are required for entry into postsecondary educational programs in emergency medical technology. Most of these programs are non-degree award programs that can be completed in less than 1 year; others last up to 2 years.”

EMT programs are normally offered by technical institutes, community colleges, and universities that specialize in emergency care training. For instance, Unitek EMT offers an accelerated EMT program based out of Arizona!

Why Should You Work as an EMT?

As an EMT, you will help alleviate the suffering of others. Not only will you better your community, but you will also develop life-saving skills, perform an invaluable service, and maintain a certain degree of job security. EMTs and other EMS personnel will always be needed for the overall health and safety of society.

Additionally, EMTs may advance into other related healthcare occupations, such as physician assistants or medical assistants. According to the BLS, some also use their EMT training to pursue “administrative positions in various healthcare settings, such as ambulatory care companies or hospitals.” It’s also important to note that aspiring firefighters may be required to complete EMT training in order to apply for jobs.

A Day in the Life of an EMT

A typical day as an EMT may differ depending on the location, employer, and individual. However, most begin their days on an ambulance with a truck check. This means EMS personnel ensure that the ambulance is fully equipped, fueled, and ready for service. These steps may include checking the onboard oxygen level, IV supplies, intubation equipment, monitor/defibrillator, backboard, etc. It’s somewhat difficult to summarize one typical day for an EMT, as it’s largely dependent on the number and type of calls they receive.

In an article by the Association of American Medical Colleges, two medical students talk about their experience as EMTs and how it prepared them for medical school. Christina Houser said the following:

“Volunteering as an EMT for Tulane and New Orleans EMS was the most influential experience that I had prior to medical school. As an EMT, I had the opportunity to perfect the basics of collecting a patient history and performing a physical exam, a necessity for any type of physician. Working as an EMT taught me how to excel in high-pressure situations, making medical school tasks ranging from taking exams to scrubbing into various surgeries much easier.”

An Overview of Unitek EMT

At Unitek EMT, we strive to prepare aspiring Emergency Medical Technicians by providing them with EMT training and an accelerated EMT program. Experts in the EMS field educate our students through a combination of traditional learning, simulation training, and workshop-style classes.

Our 14-Day Boot Camp1 is currently completed at a facility in Chandler, Arizona. Students can also attend American Heart Association (AHA) CPR courses or a stellar EMT Refresher course. This course is a combination of the traditional EMT Refresher—it includes all core material—and the NCCP National Registry 20-hour requirements, but it is presented in a 30-hour format.

If you’d like more information, please contact us toll free at 888-790-1458.

Help save lives with Unitek EMT!

 

 

1 Our 14-Day EMT Program in AZ is taught in an intensive “boot camp” style, to simulate the fast pace of work expected on the job as an EMT. 

Unitek EMT’s First Aid Series #4

Unitek EMT’s First Aid Series #4

Unitek EMT’s First Aid Series #4 Heart Attack Segment

Most people have heard the words “heart attack.” Considering that nearly a million people in the United States have a heart attack every year, this medical emergency is fairly prevalent and affects many lives.1 According to the World Health Organization, about 17.9 million people died from cardiovascular diseases in 2016. This statistic represents 31% of all global deaths.

In this installment of the First Aid Series, we’re going to take a closer look at heart attacks and why immediate treatment could save a life.2 As with previous installments, our information comes directly from a nonprofit organization called the Mayo Clinic. They are a nonprofit organization committed to clinical practice, education and research, and providing expert care to those who need healing.

Let’s start with the definition of a heart attack…

What Is a Heart Attack?

A heart attack occurs when blood flow to the heart is blocked. According to the Mayo Clinic, such a blockage is “most often a buildup of fat, cholesterol, and other substances, which form a plaque in the arteries that feed the heart (coronary arteries).”

The plaque ultimately breaks away and turns into a clot. This might damage or even destroy the heart muscle. The good news is that, while a heart attack can be fatal, treatment has significantly improved over time. If you think someone might be having a heart attack, seek emergency assistance IMMEDIATELY.

How Do You Recognize a Heart Attack?

Symptoms or signs of a heart attack can be tricky. Some are obvious—think chest-clutching pain—while others might vary or seem downright normal. Another important factor to keep in mind is that not everyone has the same severity of symptoms.

Unfortunately, some people have no symptoms. Others yet will have symptoms that strike suddenly and intensely. According to the Mayo Clinic, “Many people have warning signs and symptoms hours, days, or weeks in advance. The earliest warning might be recurrent chest pain or pressure (angina) that’s triggered by exertion and relieved by rest.”

Common heart attack signs and symptoms include the following:

  • Pressure, tightness, pain, or a squeezing or aching sensation in your chest or arms that may spread to your neck, jaw, or back
  • Nausea, indigestion, heartburn, or abdominal pain
  • Shortness of breath
  • Cold sweat
  • Fatigue
  • Lightheadedness or sudden dizziness

How Do You Provide First Aid If Someone Has a Heart Attack?

Unitek EMT’s First Aid Series #4

Take immediate action. Some might not recognize the signs, which could prove to be fatal. Call for emergency medical assistance if you think you might be having a heart attack. If you don’t have access to emergency medical services, ask someone to drive you to the nearest hospital.

So, what should you do if you see someone having a heart attack? Mayo Clinic outlines the below steps on their website:

  1. First call for emergency medical help.
  2. Then check if the person is breathing and has a pulse.
  3. If the person isn’t breathing or you don’t find a pulse, only then should you begin CPR to keep blood flowing.
  4. Push hard and fast on the person’s chest in a fairly rapid rhythm—about 100 to 120 compressions a minute.
  5. If you haven’t been trained in CPR, doctors recommend performing only chest compressions. If you have been trained in CPR, you can go on to opening the airway and rescue breathing.

What Are Some Heart Attack Risk Factors?

While there are a number of risk factors, the Mayo Clinic notes that you can improve or eliminate many of them.

Here is their breakdown:

  • Age. “Men age 45 or older and women age 55 or older are more likely to have a heart attack than are younger men and women.”
  • Tobacco. “This includes smoking and long-term exposure to secondhand smoke.”
  • High blood pressure. “Over time, high blood pressure can damage arteries that feed your heart.”
  • High blood cholesterol or triglyceride levels. “A high level of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol (the ‘bad’ cholesterol) is most likely to narrow arteries.”
  • Obesity. “Obesity is associated with high blood cholesterol levels, high triglyceride levels, high blood pressure and diabetes.”
  • Diabetes. “Not producing enough of a hormone secreted by your pancreas (insulin) or not responding to insulin properly causes your body’s blood sugar levels to rise.”
  • Metabolic syndrome. “This occurs when you have obesity, high blood pressure and high blood sugar.”
  • Family history of heart attack. “If your siblings, parents, or grandparents have had early heart attacks (by age 55 for male relatives and by age 65 for female relatives), you might be at increased risk.”
  • Lack of physical activity. “Being inactive contributes to high blood cholesterol levels and obesity.”
  • Stress. “You might respond to stress in ways that can increase your risk of a heart attack.”
  • Illicit drug use. “Using stimulant drugs, such as cocaine or amphetamines, can trigger a spasm of your coronary arteries that can cause a heart attack.”
  • A history of preeclampsia. “This condition causes high blood pressure during pregnancy and increases the lifetime risk of heart disease.”
  • An autoimmune condition. “Having a condition such as rheumatoid arthritis or lupus can increase your risk of heart attack.”

For more information about heart attacks—including prevention strategies—be sure to check out the Mayo Clinic section that’s dedicated to this particular condition. Heart attacks are a serious medical emergency, so it’s best to arm yourself with knowledge!

A Brief Overview of Unitek EMT

At Unitek EMT, we strive to prepare aspiring Emergency Medical Technicians by providing them with EMT training and an accelerated EMT program. Experts in the EMS field educate our students through a combination of traditional learning, simulation training, and workshop-style classes.

Additionally, we offer a program with several variations to better accommodate our students. These include a 14-Day Boot Camp3 at our facility in Chandler, Arizona, and a modified version of the Boot Camp at our Fremont Campus in Northern California. We also offer several continuing education courses. In California, some participants learn how to perform CPR during our Basic Life Support (BLS) course, while others enhance their skillset with our Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) course.

Our Arizona students can attend American Heart Association (AHA) CPR courses or a stellar EMT Refresher course. This course is a combination of the traditional EMT Refresher—it includes all core material—and the NCCP National Registry 20-hour requirements, but it is presented in a 30-hour format.

If you’d like more information, please contact us toll free at 888-790-1458.

Help save lives with Unitek EMT!

 

 

1 https://medlineplus.gov/heartattack.html

2 Unitek EMT provides this information for general interest only, not as medical advice.

3 Our 14-Day EMT Program in AZ and the 14-Day on-ground portion of the EMT Program in CA are taught in an intensive “boot camp” style, to simulate the fast pace of work expected on the job as an EMT. The California EMT Program also includes online instructional hours.

Unitek EMT’s First Aid Series #3

Unitek EMT’s First Aid Series #3

Unitek EMT’s First Aid Series #3

Every year, more than 795,000 people in the United States have a stroke. This statistic was reported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). On their website, they also cite a survey in which only 38% of respondents were aware of all major symptoms and knew to call 911 when someone was having a stroke. These results are somewhat alarming, to say the least.

In this third installment of the First Aid Series, we’re going to take a closer look at strokes and why prompt treatment is absolutely critical.1 Our information comes directly from a website called the Mayo Clinic. They are a nonprofit organization committed to clinical practice, education and research, and providing expert care to those who need healing.

Now, let’s dig into the definition of a stroke…

What Is a Stroke?

According to the Mayo Clinic, a stroke “occurs when the blood supply to part of your brain is interrupted or reduced, depriving brain tissue of oxygen and nutrients. Within minutes, brain cells begin to die.”

It’s important to remember that a stroke is classified as a medical emergency. Therefore, prompt treatment is crucial. Early action may minimize brain damage or potential complications. There is some good news, though: Strokes can often be treated and prevented. In fact, the Mayo Clinic states that fewer Americans now die from strokes than they have in the past.

So How Do You Recognize a Stroke?

While symptoms might vary, there are some general signs that often signify a stroke. Watch for the below and, if possible, also pay attention to when these symptoms first start. Why? According to the Mayo Clinic, the duration of each one might affect your treatment options.

Check out the below breakdown from their website:

• Trouble with speaking and understanding. “You may experience confusion. You may slur your words or have difficulty understanding speech.”

• Paralysis or numbness of the face, arm, or leg. “You may develop sudden numbness, weakness or paralysis in your face, arm, or leg. This often happens just on one side of your body.”

• Trouble with seeing in one or both eyes. “You may suddenly have blurred or blackened vision in one or both eyes, or you may see double.”

• Headache. “A sudden, severe headache, which may be accompanied by vomiting, dizziness or altered consciousness, may indicate you’re having a stroke.”

• Trouble with walking. “You may stumble or experience sudden dizziness, loss of balance or loss of coordination.”

How Do You Provide First Aid to a Stroke Victim?

Call emergency medical services if you notice any signs of a stroke, even if they seem to waver or disappear. The Mayo Clinic advises that you think “FAST” and do the following…

• Face. “Ask the person to smile. Does one side of the face droop?”

• Arms. “Ask the person to raise both arms. Does one arm drift downward? Or is one arm unable to rise up?”

• Speech. “Ask the person to repeat a simple phrase. Is his or her speech slurred or strange?”

• Time. “If you observe any of these signs, call 911 immediately.”

Please remember that time is critical. Don’t wait to see if the symptoms persist—every minute counts during a medical emergency. If you’re with someone who you suspect is having a stroke, watch them closely while waiting for first responders to arrive.

What Are Some Stroke Risk Factors?

There are numerous factors that can increase your stroke risk. Potentially treatable risk factors include but are not limited to the following:

+ Lifestyle risk factors

  • Being overweight or obese
  • Physical inactivity
  • Heavy or binge drinking
  • Use of illicit drugs such as cocaine and methamphetamines

+ Medical risk factors

  • Blood pressure readings higher than 120/80 millimeters of mercury (mm Hg)
  • Cigarette smoking or exposure to secondhand smoke
  • High cholesterol
  • Diabetes
  • Obstructive sleep apnea
  • Cardiovascular disease, including heart failure, heart defects, heart infection, or abnormal heart rhythm
  • Personal or family history of stroke or heart attack

For more information about strokes—including causes and prevention—be sure to check out the Mayo Clinic section that’s dedicated to this particular condition. Strokes impact more people than you might think!

A Brief Overview of Unitek

At Unitek EMT, we strive to prepare aspiring Emergency Medical Technicians by providing them with EMT training and an accelerated EMT program. Experts in the EMS field educate our students through a combination of traditional learning, simulation training, and workshop-style classes.

Additionally, we offer a program with several variations to better accommodate our students. These include a 14-Day Boot Camp2 at our Fremont Campus in Northern California, and a modified version of the Boot Camp at our facility in Chandler, Arizona. If you’d like more information, please contact us toll free at 888-790-1458.

Help save lives with Unitek EMT!

 

 

1 Unitek EMT provides this information for general interest only, not as medical advice.

2 Our 14-Day EMT Program in AZ and the 14-Day on-ground portion of the EMT Program in CA are taught in an intensive “boot camp” style, to simulate the fast pace of work expected on the job as an EMT. The California EMT Program also includes online instructional hours.

Unitek EMT’s First Aid Series #2

Unitek EMT’s First Aid Series #2

Imagine being so cold that you actually start to feel incredibly, irrationally hot. This is what can happen during the final stages of hypothermia. Unfortunately, some people do not recognize the signs until it’s too late—confusion is one possible symptom of hypothermia.

At Unitek EMT, we recently started a series that examines specific conditions, provides relevant information, and reviews what should typically be done until EMS workers arrive.1 In this second installment, we’re going to take a look at hypothermia and the havoc it wreaks in the human body.

We’ve taken our information directly from a website called the Mayo Clinic. They are a nonprofit organization committed to clinical practice, education and research, and providing expert care to those who need healing.

Now, let’s delve a little deeper into hypothermia…

Unitek EMT’s First Aid Series #2

What Is Hypothermia?

According to the Mayo Clinic, hypothermia is a “medical emergency that occurs when your body loses heat faster than it can produce heat, causing a dangerously low body temperature.” Normal body temperature tends to fall around 98.6 F (37 C). Hypothermia can occur if your temperature drops below 95 F (35 C).

So, what exactly happens when your temperature falls? In short, your heart, nervous system, and other organs can no longer operate in a normal fashion. When left untreated, hypothermia may lead to heart failure and even death.

The following are some situations that could lead to hypothermia:

  • Wearing clothes that aren’t warm enough for current weather conditions
  • Staying out in the cold too long
  • Being unable to get out of wet clothes or move to a warm, dry location
  • Falling into water (i.e. a boating accident)
  • Living in a house that’s too cold, either from poor heating or too much air conditioning

How Do You Recognize Hypothermia?

The Mayo Clinic cites shivering as the first symptom you’ll likely notice when your temperature drops. It’s your body’s instinctive response to plummeting temperatures. In other words, your body attempts to warm itself.

Signs and symptoms of hypothermia may include:

  • Shivering
  • Slurred speech or mumbling
  • Slow, shallow breathing
  • Weak pulse
  • Clumsiness or lack of coordination
  • Drowsiness or very low energy
  • Confusion or memory loss
  • Loss of consciousness
  • Bright red, cold skin (in infants)

It’s important to remember that someone with hypothermia may not be aware of their condition because the symptoms are often gradual. Additionally, confusion or memory loss—two possible symptoms—can prevent self-awareness and lead to risky behavior.

How Do You Provide First Aid for Hypothermia?

Call your local emergency number if you think someone has hypothermia. According to the Mayo Clinic, you should then take these steps before EMS workers arrive:

“Gently move the person inside if possible. Jarring movements can trigger dangerous irregular heartbeats. Carefully remove his or her wet clothing, replacing it with warm, dry coats or blankets.”

How Do You Prevent Hypothermia?

The best thing you can do is ensure that you stay warm in cold weather. Remembering this simple acronym may help you in the future—COLD, or cover, overexertion, layers, and dry. The Mayo Clinic breaks down what each part means: 

+ Cover. “Wear a hat or other protective covering to prevent body heat from escaping from your head, face and neck. Cover your hands with mittens instead of gloves.”

+ Overexertion. “Avoid activities that would cause you to sweat a lot. The combination of wet clothing and cold weather can cause you to lose body heat more quickly.”

+ Layers. “Wear loose fitting, layered, lightweight clothing. Outer clothing made of tightly woven, water-repellent material is best for wind protection. Wool, silk or polypropylene inner layers hold body heat better than cotton does.”

+ Dry. “Stay as dry as possible. Get out of wet clothing as soon as possible. Be especially careful to keep your hands and feet dry, as it’s easy for snow to get into mittens and boots.”

For more information about hypothermia—including child safety and winter car safety—be sure to check out the Mayo Clinic section that’s dedicated to this particular condition. It’s easier than you might think to develop hypothermia!

A Brief Overview of Unitek EMT

At Unitek EMT, we strive to prepare aspiring Emergency Medical Technicians by providing them with EMT training and an accelerated EMT program. Experts in the EMS field educate our students through a combination of traditional learning, simulation training, and workshop-style classes.

Additionally, we offer a program with several variations to better accommodate our students. These include a 14-Day Boot Camp2 at our Fremont Campus in Northern California, and a modified version of the Boot Camp at our facility in Chandler, Arizona. If you’d like more information, please contact us toll free at 888-790-1458.

Help save lives with Unitek EMT!

 

 

1 Unitek EMT provides this information for general interest only, not as medical advice.

2 Our 14-Day EMT Program in AZ and the 14-Day on-ground portion of the EMT Program in CA are taught in an intensive “boot camp” style, to simulate the fast pace of work expected on the job as an EMT. The California EMT Program also includes online instructional hours.

Unitek EMT’s First Aid Series

Unitek EMT’s First Aid Series

Have you ever wondered what happens to the body during a seizure? At Unitek EMT, we’re starting a new series that aims to answer questions like this one.1 In each segment, we’ll look into a specific event, provide relevant information, and review what should typically be done until EMS workers arrive.

For today’s segment, we’ve taken information directly from a helpful website called Mayo Clinic. They are a nonprofit organization committed to clinical practice, education and research, and providing expert care to those who need healing.

Now, let’s take a closer look at seizures…

What Is a Seizure?

Unitek EMT’s First Aid Series

According to Mayo Clinic, a seizure is “a sudden, uncontrolled electrical disturbance in the brain.” Some have even referred to seizures as electrical storms of the brain. They can alter your behavior, movements, feelings, or consciousness. Mayo Clinic also notes that you may have a condition called epilepsy if you experience a) two or more seizures or b) a tendency to have recurrent seizures.

There are various types of seizures, and they range in severity. They’re usually categorized by how and where they occur in the brain. On average, most seizures will last between thirty seconds and two minutes. Mayo Clinic states that a seizure lasting longer than five minutes is a medical emergency.

In truth, seizures may be more common than you think. Though the cause of a seizure is often unknown, they can occur after a stroke, a closed head injury, or an infection such as meningitis. Other possible contributors may include a high fever, lack of sleep, certain medications, brain tumor, alcohol abuse, or recreational drugs.

How Do You Recognize a Seizure?

According to Mayo Clinic, “signs and symptoms can range from mild to severe and vary depending on the type of seizure.” Doctors commonly classify seizures as focal or generalized, a categorization that depends on how and where abnormal brain activity begins. However, if they don’t have this information, seizures might be classified as unknown onset.

The following are potential signs and symptoms:

  • Temporary confusion
  • A staring spell
  • Uncontrollable jerking movements of the arms and legs
  • Loss of consciousness or awareness
  • Cognitive or emotional symptoms, such as fear, anxiety, or déjà vu (the feeling that you have already seen or experienced something before)

When Should You See a Doctor?

Mayo Clinic advises that you seek immediate medical assistance if you experience a seizure for the first time or if any of the following occurs:

  • The seizure lasts more than five minutes
  • Breathing or consciousness doesn’t return after the seizure stops
  • A second seizure immediately follows the first
  • You have a high fever
  • You’re experiencing heat exhaustion
  • You’re pregnant
  • You have diabetes
  • You’ve injured yourself during the seizure

How Do You Provide First Aid for Seizures?

It’s critical that you know what to do if someone else has a seizure. On the flip side, if you are the one at risk of having seizures, give this information to family, friends, or co-workers in case you experience one around them.

To help someone during a seizure, take these steps before EMS workers arrive:

  1. Carefully roll the person onto one side
  2. Place something soft under their head
  3. Loosen tight neckwear
  4. Avoid putting your fingers or other objects in the person’s mouth
  5. Don’t try to restrain someone who is having a seizure
  6. Clear away dangerous objects if the person is moving
  7. Stay with the person until first responders arrive
  8. Observe the person closely so that you can provide details on what happened
  9. Time the seizure
  10. Stay calm

For more information about seizures—including diagnosis/treatment and departments/specialties—be sure to check out the Mayo Clinic section that’s dedicated to this particular condition.

A Brief Overview of Unitek EMT

At Unitek EMT, we strive to prepare aspiring Emergency Medical Technicians by providing them with EMT training and an accelerated EMT program. Experts in the EMS field educate our students through a combination of traditional learning, simulation training, and workshop-style classes.

Additionally, we offer a program with several variations to better accommodate our students. These include a 14-Day Boot Camp2 at our Fremont Campus in Northern California, and a modified version of the Boot Camp at our facility in Chandler, Arizona. If you’d like more information, please contact us toll free at 888-790-1458.

Help save lives with Unitek EMT!

 

1 Unitek EMT provides this information for general interest only, not as medical advice.

2 Our 14-Day EMT Program in AZ and the 14-Day on-ground portion of the EMT Program in CA are taught in an intensive “boot camp” style, to simulate the fast pace of work expected on the job as an EMT. The California EMT Program also includes online instructional hours.

A Look at Emergency Medical Services in Australia

A Look at Emergency Medical Services in Australia

Welcome to another installment of our exploratory series: A Look at EMS in Different Countries! Previously, we looked at EMS in the United Kingdom, Japan, and Spain. Today we’re going to shift our focus toward Australia.

As with the other segments in this series, we’ve taken our information from a source called Trek Medics International. According to their website, Trek Medics is a nongovernmental organization “dedicated to improving emergency medical systems in communities across the globe without reliable access to emergency care through innovative mobile phone technologies.”

Join us for a trip to the Oceania country of Australia…

A Look at Emergency Medical Services in Australia

A Quick Overview of EMS in Australia

When you think of Australia, your mind might conjure beaches, open spaces, and a variety of exotic animals. According to sites like the Observatory of Economic Complexity, Australia is also the world’s leading exporter of iron ore. You might not know about their emergency medical services, though, so let’s start with a brief summary by Trek Medics!

They state that Australia “boasts one of the most advanced ambulance services in the world,” with some of the “most well-trained prehospital providers.” In addition, access to “24-7 emergency services is available across the country, though the Outback clearly presents logistical challenges.”

Below is a breakdown from the Trek Medics database:

+ Paramedic:

  • Will generally hold a Bachelor of Paramedicine with additional training from the designated state ambulance service. Skills include IV access, fluids, laryngoscopy, advanced airways, and S8 analgesia administration.

+ Intensive Care Ambulance (ICP)

  • Additional 1-3 years of training involving a combination of classroom theory, hospital attachments, and on-road component. Additional skills include RSI, advanced cardiac medications, and decompression of tension pneumothorax.

+ Extended Care Paramedic (ECP)

  • Additional 1 year of training in low-acuity paramedicine involving 2-month course run by physicians and hospital placements. Skills include antibiotic prescribing, suturing, and catheterization.

How to Call for Help

In Australia, dial 000 to access emergency medical services. While you can use this number to call for help throughout the country, it’s important to remember that the Outback can be somewhat isolating and potentially pose problems of its own.

Regarding disaster situations, you would still dial 000 from anywhere in the country. According to Trek Medics, “Operators are able to activate a host of additional disaster response services, including State Emergency Service (SES), Fire and Police Rescue, Ambulance Special Operations (SOT), and mobile hospital medical teams.”

EMS Transportation

Trek Medics provides a breakdown for transportation as well. Check it out below!

+ How: Transport is provided by ambulance (typically a Mercedes Sprinter). In remote areas, “transport to base hospitals will be by fixed wing aircraft or helicopter.”

+ Where: Patients are often taken to the closest public hospital. In cases of serious injury, patients would be taken to major trauma centres. Other specialty destinations “include burn, cardiac, and pediatric centers.”

Payment for EMS Assistance

If you’re wondering how you would pay for an ambulance, each Australian state determines the standard cost for ground and air ambulances. According to Trek Medics, though, the general fee will range between AUD $300-$1000. It’s charged directly to the patient unless they are either a) covered by private insurance or b) on a pension.

Common Emergencies

Look out for these ones…

  • Shark attacks
  • Drownings
  • Floods
  • Spider and snake bites

For more information, such as recommended vaccinations and government oversight, be sure to visit Trek Medics before you visit Australia!

About the EMT Program at Unitek EMT

If you’re not familiar with us, Unitek EMT strives to prepare aspiring Emergency Medical Technicians by providing them with an accelerated EMT program. Seasoned professionals educate our students through a combination of traditional learning, simulation training, and workshop-style classes.

Additionally, we offer a program with several variations to better accommodate our students. These include a 14-Day Boot Camp1 at our Fremont Campus in Northern California, and a modified version of the Boot Camp at our facility in Chandler, Arizona.

If you’d like more information, please contact us toll free at 888-790-1458!

 

 

 

1 Our 14-Day EMT Program in AZ and the 14-Day on-ground portion of the EMT Program in CA are taught in an intensive “boot camp” style, to simulate the fast pace of work expected on the job as an EMT. The California EMT Program also includes online instructional hours.

Unitek EMT Looks at Quick and Easy Recipes for EMS Workers

Quick and Easy Recipes for EMS Workers

Unitek EMT Looks at Quick and Easy Recipes for EMS Workers

We all know it can be tough to make dinner after a hectic work day. This is especially true for EMS workers. Sometimes they work long shifts, and other times their non-traditional hours may bleed into lunch or dinner. It’s understandable why so many people order take-out rather than healthier, more time consuming options.

However, there are easy recipes out there! A website called Eating Well has put together a list of 20-minute dinner recipes that are simple yet nutritious. Below we’ve included fourteen of them to help you and your family enjoy some new, excellent meals this week.

Try these satisfying dishes with us…

Fourteen Delicious Dinner Recipes

1. Easy Pea & Spinach Carbonara: “Fresh pasta cooks up faster than dried, making it a must-have for fast weeknight dinners like this luscious yet healthy meal.”

2. Beef & Bean Sloppy Joes: “This healthy copycat recipe of the comfort food classic trades beans for some of the meat to bump up fiber by 7 grams. We also cut back on the sugar and ketchup in this Sloppy Joe recipe makeover.”

3. Classic Sesame Noodles with Chicken: “Classic sesame noodles become a healthy meal with lean chicken and tons of veggies in this quick recipe for Asian noodles.”

4. Spanakopita Scrambled Egg Pitas: “This meatless dinner comes together in only 15 minutes, thanks to the convenience of frozen chopped spinach and crumbled feta.”

5. Walnut-Rosemary Crusted Salmon: “Salmon and walnuts are both great sources of omega-3 fatty acids. Pair this easy salmon recipe with a simple salad and a side of roasted potatoes or quinoa.”

6. Pork & Broccoli Thai Noodle Salad: “Crunchy broccoli slaw—available in most supermarkets near the other coleslaw mixes—is the secret to making this Thai noodle recipe super-fast.”

7. Mozzarella, Basil & Zucchini Frittata: “This vegetable-studded frittata recipe is one of the quickest meals you can make. Make it for breakfast, or serve for lunch or dinner with a tossed salad.”

8. Quick Shrimp Puttanesca: “Because refrigerated fresh pasta cooks much faster than dried pasta, this Italian pasta dish will be on the table lickety-split!”

9. Beef Pad Thai: “We’ve bulked up the serving size of beef pad Thai by adding in lots of healthy veggies like matchstick carrots, snap peas, and scallions.”

10. Japanese Chicken-Scallion Rice Bowl: “Here’s the quintessence of Japanese home cooking: an aromatic, protein-rich broth served over rice.”

11. Skillet Chicken with Cranberries & Apples: “Celebrate the flavors of fall with chicken cooked in a fast apple-cranberry sauce. Serve with quick-cooking wild rice and roasted Brussels sprouts.”

12. Philly Cheese Steak Sloppy Joes: “Two of our favorite comfort-food sandwiches join forces in these family-friendly dinner sandwiches.”

13. Vegan Coconut Chickpea Curry: “To make this 20-minute vegan curry even faster, buy precut veggies from the salad bar at the grocery store. To make it a full, satisfying dinner, serve over cooked brown rice.”

14. One-Pot Greek Pasta: “A little bit of Sunday meal prep goes a long way in this one-dish Mediterranean pasta recipe. The pasta is cooked ahead of time and stored in the fridge to use for meals all week.”

A Quick Overview of Unitek EMT

At Unitek EMT, we strive to prepare aspiring Emergency Medical Technicians by providing them with EMT training and accelerated EMT courses. Experts in the EMS field educate our students through a combination of traditional learning, simulation training, and workshop-style classes.

Additionally, we offer a program with several variations to better accommodate our students. These include a 14-Day Boot Camp1 at our Fremont Campus in Northern California, and a modified version of the Boot Camp at our facility in Chandler, Arizona.

If you’d like more information, please contact us toll free at 888-790-1458!

 

 

 

1 Our 14-Day EMT Program in AZ and the 14-Day on-ground portion of the EMT Program in CA are taught in an intensive “boot camp” style, to simulate the fast pace of work expected on the job as an EMT. The California EMT Program also includes online instructional hours.

A Look at Emergency Medical Services in Spain | Unitek EMT

A Look at Emergency Medical Services in Spain

To kick off 2019, we’ve decided to continue our exploratory series: A Look at EMS in Different Countries! Recently, we looked at EMS in Japan and the United Kingdom, and today we’re going to shift our focus toward Spain. Whether you’re naturally curious or you’d like to know for future travel plans, we hope this information will benefit you down the line!

As with the other segments in this series, we’ve taken our information from a source called Trek Medics International. According to their website, Trek Medics is a 501c3-registered nongovernmental organization (NGO) “dedicated to improving emergency medical systems in communities across the globe without reliable access to emergency care through innovative mobile phone technologies.”

Join us for a trip to the sunny country of Spain…

A Look at Emergency Medical Services in Spain | Unitek EMT

A Brief Overview of EMS in Spain

When you think of Spain, you might picture gorgeous beaches, sunny weather, or flamenco music. You might also think of wine; according to sites like World Atlas, Spain is one of the top wine-producing countries in the world. You might not know about their emergency medical services, though, so let’s delve right into the heart of the matter!

Trek Medics states that “Spain, like France and Germany, relies on a physician-based staff to provide prehospital emergency care, with clinical support from nurses, logistics emergency technicians, and ambulance support staff.” They included the below breakdown in their database:

+ Emergency Physician: University degree in medicine; master of emergency medicine; medical specialty in cardiology, anesthesiology, family medicine, or intensive care medicine

+ Emergency Nurse: University degree in nursing; master of emergency nursing; nursing specialty in community nursing, or medical surgical nursing

+ Emergency Medical Technician: Vocational/community college

+ Patient Transport Assistant: Private courses

How to Call for Emergency Medical Services

In an emergency, dial 112 to access ambulatory services, the police, or fire departments. Previously, 061 was the phone number that people used to request an ambulance in Spain. Now the 061 call centers are being integrated into 112 control centers, which coordinate the dispatching of emergency medical services.

If you’re wondering about other emergency numbers, Trek Medics states that, “prior to efforts by the European Union to streamline emergency communications through 112, Spain used several different numbers which are still accessible.” These include the following:

  • Ambulances: 061
  • Fire Department: 080
  • Police: 091 (to call the Spanish police internationally, dial 91 582 29 00)
  • Civil Guard: 082 (who will contact other appropriate response agencies where required)
  • Domestic/Gender-based Violence: 016
  • Poison Control: 91 562 04 20

EMS Transportation in Spain

According to Trek Medics, Spain’s emergency response system is decentralized and physician led. They offer more information within their database, and we have included some of this information below:

+ Once a person calls 112, the switchboard operator will determine “the nature of the emergency and the location” and send this information to “a dispatching physician at the appropriate call center.”

+ The physician will then speak with the caller to determine the correct response, which can include the following options.

  • Ground Teams, which may send one or more of the below units:
    o Non-emergency ambulance staffed with 1-2 EMTs/first responders
    o Basic Life Support (BLS) staffed with 2-3 EMTs
    o Intermediate Life Support (ILS) staffed by an emergency nurse and 1-2 EMTs
    o Advanced Life Support (ALS)/mobile ICU, staffed with a doctor, emergency nurse, and 1-2 EMTs
    o Inter-hospital transfer vehicle, staffed by a doctor, emergency nurse, and 1-2 EMTs
  • Air Medical (Helicopter Ambulance)
    o Includes a pilot, flight engineer, doctor, emergency nurse, and possibly 1-2 EMTs

For more information, such as common emergencies, recommended vaccinations, and government oversight, be sure to visit Trek Medics before you take your trip!

About the EMT Program at Unitek EMT

If you’re not familiar with us, Unitek EMT strives to prepare aspiring Emergency Medical Technicians by providing them with an accelerated EMT program. Seasoned professionals educate our students through a combination of traditional learning, simulation training, and workshop-style classes.

Additionally, we offer a program with several variations to better accommodate our students. These include a 14-Day Boot Camp1 at our Fremont Campus in Northern California, and a modified version of the Boot Camp at our facility in Chandler, Arizona.

If you’d like more information, please contact us toll free at 888-790-1458!

 

 

 

1 Our 14-Day EMT Program in AZ and the 14-Day on-ground portion of the EMT Program in CA are taught in an intensive “boot camp” style, to simulate the fast pace of work expected on the job as an EMT. The California EMT Program also includes online instructional hours.