When People Are Reunited with EMS Lifesavers

When Victims Are Reunited with EMS Lifesavers

When People Are Reunited with EMS Lifesavers

In New York, seventeen people nearly lost their lives. They recently had the opportunity to reunite with the paramedics and the EMTs who saved them. An article by FireRescue1 looks at the actions of some of these guardian angels. From a preacher to an FDNY veteran, the quick thinking of first responders undoubtedly saved lives.

As an emergency medical services (EMS) professional, you can greatly impact people throughout your community. In today’s blog post, we’re going to look at some exceptional EMS stories and how they’ve affected various lives…

Heroic Acts in the EMS Community

One individual compared his near-death experience to a rebirth. A Baptist preacher from Queens, Reverend Jeffrey Thompson was preaching to his congregation when he suddenly went into cardiac arrest. Thankfully, paramedics Giovanni Reggler and Shaun King arrived in record time.

In May 2019, Reverend Thompson reunited with his rescuers at the Liberty Warehouse in Red Hook, New York. “It means a tremendous amount to be able to say thank you,” Thompson said before pulling Reggler and King into one big hug. “I’m lucky to be here.”

In another story of valor, Anthony Garofalo received aid after collapsing and experiencing chest pain. A father of two teenage daughters, Garofalo was treated by Emergency Medical Technicians (EMTs) from Station 23 and firefighters from Engine Company 157.

“They hit me with that defibrillator like 13 times, no one gave up,” Garofalo said. “They just kept pulling for me. I’m just truly blessed and thankful…I have a wonderful life.”

The last story involves a 37-year veteran of the New York City Fire Department (FDNY). According to FireRescue1, “Bill Staudt had his brothers and sisters in arms to thank for his new lease on life.” While working at the fire department’s Research and Development office in Fort Totten, Staudt felt a burning sensation in his chest and collapsed next to his colleagues.

Firefighter Patrick Shields saved his life by providing CPR and calling EMTs, who immediately ran to help from a nearby building. Of their actions that day, Staudt said, “They’re the true heroes.”

When asked about all these close calls, FDNY Chief of Department John Sudnik attributed the outcomes to their department’s rigorous training regimen. He explained:

“We practice, we work as a team so we are always ready for those life-threatening emergencies. Thankfully, this morning, as a result of all that preparedness, we are able to put smiling faces to those calls, and our members are able to meet the people whose life they saved.”

To learn more about EMS lifesavers, be sure to check out FireRescue1’s article as well as their informative “Fire News” section.

A Quick Look at Unitek EMT

Unitek EMT Looks Back at Operation Urban Rescue

If you’re interested in EMS but haven’t taken that next step, you might want to consider EMT training! At Unitek EMT, we strive to prepare aspiring Emergency Medical Technicians by providing them with an accelerated EMT program. Experts in the EMS field educate our students through a combination of traditional learning, simulation training, and workshop-style classes.

Our 14-Day Boot Camp1 is currently completed at a facility in Chandler, Arizona. Students can also attend American Heart Association (AHA) CPR courses or a stellar EMT Refresher course. Additionally, a BLS course is offered at the Chandler facility as well.

Many aspiring firefighters also seek EMT certification to increase their employment opportunities. In fact, some employers will only hire firefighters with EMT training. To learn more about this preference, check out one of our firefighter blog posts here.

For more information about the program, please contact us toll free at 888-790-1458.

Learn how to save lives with Unitek EMT!

 

 

 

1 Our 14-Day EMT Program in AZ is taught in an intensive “boot camp” style, to simulate the fast pace of work expected on the job as an EMT.

EMS Advice for Patient Handovers

EMS Advice for Patient Handovers

EMS Advice for Patient Handovers

Once you’ve become an EMT, you will experience countless patient handovers. This is the time when you transfer a patient to another EMS provider or the receiving party. According to an EMS1 article by Rommie L. Duckworth, patient handovers are “the most dangerous point in a patient’s ED journey.” The World Health Organization also states that gaps in communication can cause “serious breakdowns in the continuity of care, inappropriate treatment, and potential harm to the patient.”

In this blog post, we’re going to look at EMS1’s list of recommendations for patient handovers. Following them could help you save a life…

10 Pieces of Advice to Help Save Lives

1. Look at Other Industries: “Effective handover processes have been studied by many industries where communications is mission-critical, including commercial aviation, nuclear facilities, the military and fire/rescue organizations. While the exact practices of how to overcome noise and other challenges will vary from industry to industry, EMS can learn a lot from the practices that other industries have successfully adopted.”

2. Make Communication a Priority: “Receiving providers are often so focused on the critical care needs of patients that they jump right in without paying attention to communication from the reporting providers. EMS providers must ensure and assure receiving providers that all lifesaving care will be continued while the reporting team leader gives the receiving team leader an efficient handover report.”

3. Share Your Mental Model: “To provide great patient care, an EMS provider must make sure that they share the same mental model of their patient’s situation with their team. If team members have a different understanding of what is going on, care won’t be coordinated and serious errors may occur.”

For example, the following questions should be asked:

    • What is the context (stroke patient, multi-trauma, sepsis, etc.)?
    • What got us to this point?
    • Where are we right now?
    • What is the priority?
    • What is the very next thing that needs to happen?

4. Be Sure to Prioritize Information: “Priority information, such as ‘trauma alert’ and ‘BP 60 over 40,’ must be delivered first for the receiving team to develop a mental model and understand the situation. Supplementary information, such as ‘patient has had a hysterectomy,’ still matters, but the receiving team shouldn’t be bombarded with it up front.”

5. Streamline the Communication Process: “The goal is for the right information to be in front of the right people at the right time, even across multiple patient handovers. Modern communication systems, including prehospital notification software, allow information to be captured early and easily, and efficiently delivered to all key patient care providers along the continuum of care.”

6. Always Make Eye Contact: “When delivering a face-to-face patient handover report, it’s important for the reporting and receiving team leaders to make direct eye contact. An EMS provider trying to give a report while moving a patient over to the hospital bed, or a receiving nurse ‘listening’ while looking up the patient’s hospital medical record, will cause information to be misunderstood or completely missed.”

7. Control What You Can: “While we may not always have as much control over the environment as we would like, it’s important to minimize distractions, interruptions and disruptors of communication. Simply taking a moment to close the door or turn down a radio can make the whole handover process more efficient and less error-prone.”

8. Provide a Report that is Structured and Consistent: “While SBAR (situation, background, assessment, recommendation) may be the most commonly used mnemonic in the United States, whichever one you choose to provide structure and standardization to your reports, ensure that it is understood and used by both reporting and receiving providers so that everyone is speaking the same language.”

9. Provide Additional Documentation: “Supplementary information can be critical to the ongoing care of the patient and should be complete and correct when handed over, but it should never overshadow the key points and priority information delivered upfront in the patient handover. This information can be provided verbally, in written form or electronically delivered.”

10. Turn Problems into Opportunities: “Fortunately, great patient handover practices can do more than just help us avoid errors—they also provide the opportunity for a new look at the patient’s condition. The Department of Defense says that patient handovers present not only points of vulnerability, but also potential times to correct errors and gain a fresh clinical perspective.”

To learn more about how some EMS systems are already mandating several of these recommendations, be sure to check out EMS1’s article as well as their stellar “Future of EMS” section.

A Brief Overview of Unitek EMT

Unitek EMT Expands to Chandler and Now Offers EMT Training in Arizona

If you’re interested in EMS, you might want to consider EMT training! At Unitek EMT, we strive to prepare aspiring Emergency Medical Technicians by providing them with an accelerated EMT program. Experts in the EMS field educate our students through a combination of traditional learning, simulation training, and workshop-style classes.

Our 14-Day Boot Camp1 is currently completed at a facility in Chandler, Arizona. Students can also attend American Heart Association (AHA) CPR courses or a stellar EMT Refresher course. Additionally, a BLS course is offered at the Chandler facility as well.

Many aspiring firefighters also seek EMT certification to increase their employment opportunities. In fact, some employers will only hire firefighters with EMT training. To learn more about this preference, check out one of our firefighter blog posts here.

For more information about the program, please contact us toll free at 888-790-1458.

Change your future with Unitek EMT!

 

 

1 Our 14-Day EMT Program in AZ is taught in an intensive “boot camp” style, to simulate the fast pace of work expected on the job as an EMT.

X-Ray Unitek EMT

Unitek EMT’s First Aid Series #5

The First Aid Series is back, but with a twist! In this installment, we’re going to take a look at incidents you might come across in your daily life. Whether it’s at work, school, or various other places, there are three common events that require first aid: bloody noses, broken bones, and allergic reactions.

Some of these incidents might not require emergency medical services (EMS). Of course, it’s important to know when you should call for help, and it’s equally important to know the best way to handle each condition.1 There are some misconceptions about best first aid practice—particularly for nose bleeds—and you never know when you might need to put this knowledge to use, for others or yourself!

Let’s start with nosebleeds…

How to Treat a Bloody Nose

Nosebleeds might be messy, uncomfortable, and even a little scary. They can happen to anyone at any time, and they’re fairly common. According to Michigan Health, most nosebleeds are harmless and easily treatable. Typical causes include “dry climate, heated indoor air during winter months, steroid nasal sprays, or direct injury to the nose.” Additionally, people who take blood-thinning medications (anticoagulants) might be more likely to get a bloody nose.

Check out these tips from Michigan Health to stop a bloody nose:

  • Keep calm. “Bloody noses can be scary, but they are rarely dangerous.”
  • Lean forward. “If there is blood in your mouth, spit it out; do not swallow it.”
  • Stay upright. “Do not tilt your head back or lie flat. This may cause you to choke on blood. Blood in the stomach can make you sick to your stomach and cause vomiting.”
  • Try a spray. “Apply three sprays of decongestant nose spray, such as Afrin, into the side that is bleeding.”
  • Skip foreign objects. “Do not pack the nose with tissues or other household items like tampons. This can make the bleeding worse.”
  • Use a pinch. “Pinch the soft part of your nose shut for 10 minutes. Use a clock to keep track of time. Resist the urge to peek after a few minutes to see if your nose has stopped bleeding.”
  • Observe and react. “After 10 minutes, let go of your nose. If it is still bleeding, soak a cotton ball with the nose spray. Place the cotton ball into the bleeding nostril and pinch for 10 minutes. Again, use a clock to time it.”
  • Check your blood pressure. “High blood pressure can cause nosebleeds.”
  • Take it easy. “Once bleeding has stopped, do not blow your nose for two days.”
  • Avoid exertion. “It can take up to two full weeks to heal after a nosebleed. Do not lift anything heavy, such as groceries, or perform physical activities or household chores. Do not pick up young children and babies.”

In some circumstances, though, you should seek immediate medical attention. Michigan Health advises you to do so if you experience the following:

  • Bleeding that does not stop in 30 minutes.
  • Bleeding that is very heavy, pouring down the back of your throat and out the front of your nose.
  • Bleeding accompanied by other symptoms, such as very high blood pressure, light-headedness, chest pain, and/or rapid heart rate.
  • Bleeding that occurs three to four times weekly, or greater than six times per month.

How to Treat Broken Bones

X-Ray Unitek EMT

This one is probably obvious, but broken bones require medical attention. If the break was caused by major trauma or injury, be sure to call your local emergency number! The Mayo Clinic also advises that you call for emergency help if you spot any of the following scenarios:

  • The person is unresponsive, isn’t breathing or isn’t moving (begin CPR if there’s no breathing or heartbeat).
  • There is heavy bleeding.
  • Even gentle pressure or movement causes pain.
  • The limb or joint appears deformed.
  • The bone has pierced the skin.
  • The extremity of the injured arm or leg, such as a toe or finger, is numb or bluish at the tip.
  • You suspect a bone is broken in the neck, head or back.

It’s important that you refrain from moving the person to avoid further injury (unless it’s absolutely necessary). Here are a few other tips from the Mayo Clinic that you can try while waiting for medical help:

  • Stop any bleeding. “Apply pressure to the wound with a sterile bandage, a clean cloth or a clean piece of clothing.”
  • Immobilize the injured area. “Don’t try to realign the bone or push a bone that’s sticking out back in. If you’ve been trained in how to splint and professional help isn’t readily available, apply a splint to the area above and below the fracture sites.”
  • Apply ice packs to limit swelling and help relieve pain. “Don’t apply ice directly to the skin. Wrap the ice in a towel, piece of cloth or some other material.”
  • Treat for shock. “If the person feels faint or is breathing in short, rapid breaths, lay the person down with the head slightly lower than the trunk and, if possible, elevate the legs.”

How to Treat Anaphylaxis (Severe Allergic Reaction)

Allergic Reaction Unitek EMT

You might be wondering, just what is anaphylaxis? It’s a potentially life-threatening allergic reaction that might cause shock, an immediate drop in blood pressure, or trouble breathing. According to the Mayo Clinic, people with an allergy can experience anaphylaxis “minutes after exposure to a specific allergy-causing substance (allergen).”

Additionally, in some cases, there might be a delayed reaction or anaphylaxis might occur without an obvious trigger. Here are some of the Mayo Clinic’s signs and symptoms to watch for:

  • Skin reactions, including hives, itching, and flushed or pale skin.
  • Swelling of the face, eyes, lips or throat.
  • Constriction of the airways, leading to wheezing and trouble breathing.
  • A weak and rapid pulse.
  • Nausea, vomiting or diarrhea.
  • Dizziness, fainting or unconsciousness.

Some common triggers include things like medications, insect stings, or foods (think peanuts, shellfish, etc.) And here’s what the Mayo Clinic recommends that you do if you’re with someone having signs of anaphylaxis:

  • Immediately call 911 or your local medical emergency number.
  • Ask the person if they are carrying an epinephrine autoinjector (EpiPen, Auvi-Q, others) to treat an allergic attack.
  • If the person says they need to use an autoinjector, ask whether you should help inject the medication. This is usually done by pressing the autoinjector against the person’s thigh.
  • Have the person lie still on their back.
  • Loosen tight clothing and cover the person with a blanket. Don’t give them anything to drink.
  • If there’s vomiting or bleeding from the mouth, turn them on their side to prevent choking.
  • If there are no signs of breathing, coughing or movement, begin CPR. Do uninterrupted chest presses—about 100 every minute—until paramedics arrive.
  • Get emergency treatment even if symptoms start to improve. After anaphylaxis, it’s possible for symptoms to recur. Monitoring in a hospital for several hours is usually necessary.

We hope you’ve found this information helpful! If you’d like to know more about any of these conditions, be sure to visit Michigan Health and the Mayo Clinic. After all, you never know when you might encounter one of these situations…

A Brief Overview of Unitek EMT

If you’re interested in EMS and you’d like to make a career change, you might want to consider EMT training! At Unitek EMT, we strive to prepare aspiring Emergency Medical Technicians by providing them with an accelerated EMT program. Experts in the EMS field educate our students through a combination of traditional learning, simulation training, and workshop-style classes.

Our 14-Day Boot Camp2 is currently completed at a facility in Chandler, Arizona. Students can also attend American Heart Association (AHA) CPR courses or a stellar EMT Refresher course. Additionally, a BLS course is offered at the Chandler facility as well.

Many aspiring firefighters also seek EMT certification to increase their employment opportunities. In fact, some employers will only hire firefighters with EMT training. To learn more about this preference, check out one of our firefighter blog posts here.

For more information about the program, please contact us toll free at 888-790-1458.

Help save lives with Unitek EMT!

 

 

1 Unitek EMT provides this information for general interest only, not as medical advice.

2 Our 14-Day EMT Program in AZ is taught in an intensive “boot camp” style, to simulate the fast pace of work expected on the job as an EMT.

Seven Stories of EMS Heroes

EMS Heroes

Seven Stories of EMS Heroes

What, exactly, is the definition of a hero? According to Merriam-Webster, a hero is “a person admired for achievements and noble qualities” or “one who shows great courage.” It goes without saying that there are countless heroes within the EMS community. Today, we’re going to take a look at some of the inspirational first responders from 2019.

Each of these stories comes directly from EMS1, a fantastic website that supports the men and women in emergency medical services. Below are just a few of the tales they’ve told…

Seven Stories of EMS Heroes

  1. Off-duty FF-medic praised for helping man shocked by electrical line: “Ted Bowers, a firefighter-paramedic, was moving in across the street from the Warren County complex on East Silver Street in Lebanon, Ohio, when a ‘possible electrocution’ was reported. ‘He heard the commotion across the street and kind of took charge,’ Lebanon Fire Chief Steve Johnson said. ‘The gentleman is very lucky to be alive.’”
  2. Six PA. first responders honored for saving woman in cardiac arrest: “Taylor Allen, 21, suffered from a sudden cardiac arrest on July 31 at her grandmother’s home in Penn Hills. EMS Supervisor Diane Fitzhenry said the young woman likely would not have survived if it weren’t for the quick action of six of the municipality’s emergency responders.”
  3. Hospital pays tribute to paramedic who saved six lives as an organ donor: “VUMC Voice reported that staff members in Vanderbilt Health’s Cardiovascular Intensive Care Unit lined the hallways to honor Kyle Fisher, a paramedic who donated his heart, liver, kidneys, lungs and tissue on Feb. 9, as his hospital bed was moved to the operating room. His donations saved six lives.”
  4. FDNY EMT’s quick thinking saves man’s severed arm: “Francis Jost, who was covering a shift for his colleague, was able to pack the arm in ice because he knew of a nearby bar where he could get supplies. ‘I heard the cop on the radio say, ‘No, I found the arm.’ Once I heard ‘limb’ on the radio, I thought ice, hospital, go!’” Jost said.
  5. Firefighters ditch ambulance to rescue patient on icy road: “Firefighters in suburban St. Louis gave up on using an ambulance after roads became dangerously icy and instead used a stretcher to walk a patient about a mile to a hospital.”
  6. Paramedics honored for assisting in dangerous arrest: “Lambton EMS paramedics Blake Smith and Mark Duffy helped defuse an ‘extremely violent’ scene where one officer was injured.” The paramedics received an award for saving a life and assisting in the dangerous arrest.
  7. Man reunites with EMS director who saved his life, inspired him to become paramedic: “Sean Marquis said he felt ‘amazement and pride’ when meeting Austin Neuhaus, whom he helped keep alive after Neuhaus’s truck crashed into a tree in 2016.”

For more inspirational stories, be sure to check out the EMS1 series that’s dedicated to first responder heroes!

An Overview of Unitek EMT

If you are interested in EMS and you’d like to make a career change, you might want to consider enrolling in an EMT training course. At Unitek EMT, we strive to prepare aspiring Emergency Medical Technicians by providing them with an accelerated EMT program. Experts in the EMS field educate our students through a combination of traditional learning, simulation training, and workshop-style classes.

Our 14-Day Boot Camp1 is currently completed at a facility in Chandler, Arizona. Students can also attend American Heart Association (AHA) CPR courses or a stellar EMT Refresher course. Additionally, a BLS course is offered at the Chandler facility as well.

Many aspiring firefighters also seek EMT certification to increase their employment opportunities. In fact, some employers will only hire firefighters with EMT training. To learn more about this preference, check out one of our firefighter blog posts here.

For more information about the program, please contact us toll free at 888-790-1458.

Realize your dreams with Unitek EMT!

 

 

1 Our 14-Day EMT Program in AZ is taught in an intensive “boot camp” style, to simulate the fast pace of work expected on the job as an EMT.

Some Fantastic EMS Blogs to Follow Unitek EMT

Some Fantastic EMS Blogs to Follow

Some Fantastic EMS Blogs to Follow Unitek EMT

For most professions, networking can be an important step in career advancement. It might also provide you with lifelong connections and relationships. Whether you’re currently in training or you’re an EMT seeking to connect with other first responders, blogs are one potential route you can take to find EMS personnel outside of your community.

An article by the National Health Care Provider Solutions (NHCPS) delves into some great EMS blogs to read and follow. Most of their content is written by first responders who have experienced various emergency situations, such as fires, traumatic injuries, and medical crises. Check out what NHCPS has to say about them below!

Recommended EMS Blogs

  1. Everyday EMS Tips: “Everyday EMS Tips blogs vary in length, but are typically short and packed with information. Better yet, guest authors who are EMS professionals or EMS students write the blogs, which makes for laid-back, current and relatable content. Everyday EMS gives readers a little bit of everything, from EMS tips, reviews, podcasts, videos and case studies.”
  2. Journal of Emergency Medical Services (JEMS) Editor Blog: “In the JEMS Editor Blog, Editor-in-chief A.J Heightman has 30 some years of EMS experience behind his back, making for an excellent blog. He posts a couple of times a month, and the visuals and content are well worth the wait. His posts are typically short, but engaged and thought provoking.”
  3. Street Watch: Notes of a Paramedic: “Street Watch is an intriguing blog, written by a demanding paramedic himself. The blog is an account of his daily life as a paramedic. The life of EMS personnel is different every day, which makes for thrilling stories. With a couple of new blog posts a week, the news is always contemporary and timely.”
  4. Life Under the Lights: “If you’re interested in the future of EMS, Life Under the Lights is for you. Writer Chris Kaiser, EMS Professional and Firefighter, writes to shed professional light on the life of EMTs. His blogs center around breaking the stereotypes of EMS professionals and spreading awareness of the high-demand job for what it really is.”
  5. EMS1: This last one is a recommendation from us at Unitek EMT! EMS1 runs a well-balanced site with abundant information that’s frequently updated (some topics you’ll find are products, videos, jobs, etc.) They also run an “EMS News” section that provides today’s headlines as well as their most popular topics.

Of course, there are many other great EMS blogs out there. If you’d like to find more, EMS1 has put together a list of their recommendations here. Or you could start with resources like FireRescue1 and JEMS. We’d also recommend checking out our Unitek EMT blog for varied content, how-to guides, and even some EMS-friendly recipes!

Thanks to the Internet Age, connecting with other first responders—both inside and outside of your community—has never been easier. Gain some insight and develop more connections by reaching out to your fellow EMS professionals; you never know what you might learn.

An Overview of Unitek EMT

If you are interested in EMS and you’d like to make a career change, you might want to consider enrolling in an EMT training course! At Unitek EMT, we strive to prepare aspiring Emergency Medical Technicians by providing them with an accelerated EMT program. Experts in the EMS field educate our students through a combination of traditional learning, simulation training, and workshop-style classes.

Our 14-Day Boot Camp1 is currently completed at a facility in Chandler, Arizona. Students can also attend American Heart Association (AHA) CPR courses or a stellar EMT Refresher course. Additionally, a BLS course is offered at the Chandler facility as well.

Many aspiring firefighters also seek EMT certification to increase their employment opportunities. In fact, some employers will only hire firefighters with EMT training. To learn more about this preference, check out one of our firefighter blog posts here.

For more information about the program, please contact us toll free at 888-790-1458.

Change your future with Unitek EMT!

 

 

1 Our 14-Day EMT Program in AZ is taught in an intensive “boot camp” style, to simulate the fast pace of work expected on the job as an EMT.

Some First Responders Can Now Deliver Blood to Trauma Patients

Some First Responders Can Now Deliver Blood to Trauma Patients

Some First Responders Can Now Deliver Blood to Trauma Patients

In early April of 2019, FireRescue1 released an article detailing how first responders can administer blood transfusions in the field! According to the article, a deadly car accident led to the creation of a trailblazing course called Field Available Component Transfusion Response (FACT*R). Through FACT*R, first responders can learn how to quickly provide blood transfusions to trauma patients.

This specialty training was founded by Inova Health System, Inova Trauma and Blood Donor Services, and the Northern Virginia EMS Council. These agencies also collaborated with the Fairfax County and Loudoun County Fire and Rescue departments. The group initiative has placed a high volume of “massive transfusion protocol blood products” in hospital circulation to be made available in the field as needed.

FireRescue1 had this to say about the creation of FACT*R in Virginia:

“FACT*R was inspired by a Sept. 2017 crash in which a car was broadsided by a truck. The driver died at the scene, but first responders were able to save another woman and three children. Paramedics at the scene determined that the only way the passengers would survive the hours-long extrication process would be with an in-field blood transfusion. Blood was delivered directly to the scene and that move is credited with saving the critically injured family members. 

‘In situations such as the Evergreen Mills Road accident where patients face extended extrication time, paramedics now have a policy and process in place to administer lifesaving blood products directly on the scene,’ Keith Johnson, chief of Loudoun County Combined Fire and Rescue System said.”

Currently, there are also two cities in Texas that follow in-field blood transfusion protocol. In the future, this practice may potentially spread throughout the United States. Craig Evans, executive director of the Northern Virginia EMS Council, had this to say about blood transfusions in the field: “FACT*R is a regional accomplishment available to all fire and rescue services in Northern Virginia. It will serve as a model for blood distribution and accountability… A patient’s hospital visit truly begins, not with registration, but when EMS arrives on the scene.”

An Overview of Unitek EMT

If you are interested in EMS and you’d like to make a career change, you might want to consider enrolling in an EMT training course! At Unitek EMT, we strive to prepare aspiring Emergency Medical Technicians by providing them with an accelerated EMT program. Experts in the EMS field educate our students through a combination of traditional learning, simulation training, and workshop-style classes.

Our 14-Day Boot Camp1 is currently completed at a facility in Chandler, Arizona. Students can also attend American Heart Association (AHA) CPR courses or a stellar EMT Refresher course. Additionally, a BLS course is offered at the Chandler facility as well.

Many aspiring firefighters also seek EMT certification to increase their employment opportunities. In fact, some employers will only hire firefighters with EMT training. To learn more about this preference, check out one of our firefighter blog posts here.

For more information about the program, please contact us toll free at 888-790-1458.

Learn lifesaving skills with Unitek EMT!

 

 

1 Our 14-Day EMT Program in AZ is taught in an intensive “boot camp” style, to simulate the fast pace of work expected on the job as an EMT.

First Aid Unitek EMT

How to Build Your Survival First-Aid Kit

In life, you never know when you’ll need a first-aid kit. You might come across minor scrapes or cuts at work, or perhaps a family member will stumble and break a bone—all of these things can happen in remote locations, too. While you should utilize emergency medical services (EMS) when necessary, there may be times when a first-aid kit could lessen an injury or possibly even save a life.

Many first-aid kits can be found at a typical pharmacy. Inside, though, you’ll find that most are designed to treat scraped knees and minor cuts. An article by Survival Readiness not only details how you can build your own survival kit, but it lists each critical item that you’ll need to do so.

Help keep your family and loved ones safe by creating a first-aid kit. Until professional help arrives, it might make all the difference!

18 Key Items for a First-Aid Kit

  1. Assorted Adhesive Bandages: “This is probably the most basic first-aid supply. Adhesive bandages are helpful for all types of minor cuts and scrapes. The fabric type is much better as it’s more flexible and sticks to your skin.”
  2. Large Bandages: “Some injuries require more than a simple adhesive strip. If you are going to be prepared, then be prepared for large injuries as well, such as gunshot wounds or wounds caused by power tools.”
  3. Blood Clotting Agent: “People can bleed to death from serious injuries. A blood clotting agent, such as Celox, will help the wound to clot faster, reducing the total blood loss.”
  4. Medical Tape: “Most large bandages do not come with adhesive strips on them so they must be held in place with medical tape. There are many types of medical tape available, but the best are the cohesive bandages made of a stretchy material that sticks to itself.”
  5. Antiseptic: “Before bandaging, it is necessary to clean out the wound and apply something to kill any bacteria that might have entered through the broken skin. Alcohol and hydrogen peroxide are used for cleaning, and then antiseptic should be applied.”
  6. Adhesive Sutures: “A large cut needs to be closed up for healing, as well as being bandaged. If you were to go to the hospital, they would close that wound with stitches. Unless you have been trained in how to do that, you’re better off using adhesive sutures. Just make sure that the skin is clean and dry where the suture will be attached.”
  7. CPR Mask: “Modern CPR techniques use a mask between the unconscious person and the one who is trying to revive them. The purpose of this is to avoid direct contact with bodily fluids (mostly saliva), which is the fastest way of transmitting a virus.”
  8. Glucose Meter: “Used by diabetics everywhere, these small electronic devices measure blood sugar levels. While most diabetics have high blood sugar, which causes long-term problems, low blood sugar can cause several short-term problems.”
  9. Blood Pressure Cuff: “High and low blood pressure can cause a number of problems as well. This is one of the key vital signs that medical personnel use to determine a patient’s overall medical condition.”
  10. Ear Thermometer: “Another vital sign that medical personnel look for is temperature. While an oral thermometer works, an in-the-ear model is both faster and more accurate.”
  11. Aluminum Splint: “Broken bones need to be immobilized. While just about anything can be used to splint them, aluminum splint material is universal. This is an aluminum strip coated with a layer of foam rubber on one side.”
  12. Elastic Bandage: “When it is necessary to support a joint due to a sprain, an elastic bandage is used. They are also useful for holding an aluminum splint in place. These come in a variety of widths to accommodate different sized joints.”
  13. Tweezers and a Magnifying Glass: “Splinters can be painful and get infected. With a pair of tweezers and a magnifying glass, they can be easily removed.”
  14. Eye Cup and Saline: “The best way to get something out of the eye, such as chemicals or dust, is to flush it with water. This is done by using an eye cup filled with saline solution.”
  15. Syrup of Ipecac: “If something that is potentially poisonous is swallowed, the best thing to do is induce vomiting. Syrup of Ipecac is used specifically for this purpose, especially for children.”
  16. Instant Cold Pack: “In the case of many injuries, such as a twisted ankle or a sprained wrist, putting something cold on it can reduce the swelling and associated pain. However, this must be done quickly before it has a chance to swell.”
  17. Rubber Gloves: “Just like the CPR mask is designed to protect the care giver from becoming infected by air, rubber gloves are needed as well to protect picking up bacteria and viruses through touch.”
  18. Pain Reliever: “Maybe aspirin seems a bit obvious for this list, but it is an important ingredient in any first-aid kit. [When] someone is injured, a few pain relievers [may be] necessary. They also work to prevent swelling, which is important for many types of injuries.”

An Overview of Unitek EMT

If you are interested in first aid and you’d like to make a career change, you might want to consider EMT training. At Unitek EMT, we strive to prepare aspiring Emergency Medical Technicians by providing them with an accelerated EMT program. Experts in the EMS field educate our students through a combination of traditional learning, simulation training, and workshop-style classes.

Our 14-Day Boot Camp1 is currently completed at a facility in Chandler, Arizona. Students can also attend American Heart Association (AHA) CPR courses or a stellar EMT Refresher course. Additionally, a BLS course is offered at the Chandler facility as well.

Many aspiring firefighters also seek EMT certification to increase their employment opportunities. In fact, some employers will only hire firefighters with EMT training. To learn more about this preference, check out one of our firefighter blog posts here.

For more information about the program, please contact us toll free at 888-790-1458.

Change your future with Unitek EMT!

 

 

1 Our 14-Day EMT Program in AZ is taught in an intensive “boot camp” style, to simulate the fast pace of work expected on the job as an EMT.

how long does it take to become an EMT?

High-Protein Snacks for First Responders

how long does it take to become an EMT?

Whether you’re a first responder or you’re still in training, you’ll need high-protein snacks that are both healthy and portable. A helpful article by Healthline features a number of snacks that fit the bill and can be eaten between calls or classes. When you live a busy lifestyle, snacks can be a lifesaver.

Unfortunately, many snacks are high in sugar and refined carbs, which can leave you unsatisfied and lethargic on the job. According to Healthline, the key is to “make sure your snacks are nutritious and contain protein. Protein promotes fullness because it signals the release of appetite-suppressing hormones, slows digestion, and stabilizes blood sugar levels.”

Here are some of the high-protein snacks Healthline included on their list!

10 Portable Snack Ideas

1. Jerky: “Jerky is meat that has been trimmed of fat, cut into strips, and dried. It makes an excellent and convenient snack. It’s very high in protein, containing an impressive 9 grams per ounce (28 grams). Beef, chicken, turkey and salmon are often made into jerky.”

2. Trail Mix: “Trail mix is a combination of dried fruit and nuts that is sometimes combined with chocolate and grains. It is a good source of protein, providing eight grams in a two-ounce serving. You can increase the amount of protein in trail mix by using almonds or pistachios, which are slightly higher in protein than other types of nuts such as walnuts or cashews.”

3. Turkey Roll-Ups: “Turkey roll-ups are a delicious and nutritious high-protein snack, consisting of cheese and veggies wrapped inside slices of turkey breast. Snacks that are high in protein and low in carbs, such as turkey roll-ups, have been shown to improve blood sugar levels, which is an important factor for appetite regulation.”

4. Greek Yogurt Parfait: “Greek yogurt is an ideal healthy and high-protein snack, with 20 grams of protein per one-cup serving (224 grams). It has been shown to be more filling than yogurts with lower protein contents. In addition to being a great source of protein, Greek yogurt is also high in calcium, which is important for bone health.”

5. No-Bake Energy Bites: “Energy bites are a delicious, high-protein snack made by combining a variety of ingredients, such as nut butter, oats and seeds, and then rolling them into balls. The best part about energy bites is that they don’t require baking. You can prepare a batch ahead of time so that you have a snack available when you need to grab one and go.

Here is a recipe for peanut butter energy bites, which provide five grams of protein per serving.”

6. Roasted Chickpeas: “Chickpeas, or garbanzo beans, are a legume with an impressive nutrient profile. A half-cup serving (82 grams) contains 7.5 grams of protein and 6 grams of fiber, in addition to providing some of almost every vitamin and mineral. They are particularly high in folate, iron, magnesium, phosphorus, copper and manganese.

The combination of fiber and nutrients in chickpeas may help reduce the risk of several conditions, such as heart disease, type 2 diabetes and some cancers. One tasty way to prepare chickpeas for a snack is by roasting them with some basic seasonings and olive oil. Roasted chickpeas are crunchy and portable, so you can take them with you and enjoy them when hunger hits.”

7. Lentil Salad: “A lentil salad is a great snack. It’s highly nutritious and a great plant-based source of protein. In fact, one cup provides 18 grams of protein, along with high amounts of iron, folate and manganese. In addition, lentils provide over 50% of your recommended daily fiber intake. The specific type of fiber found in lentils may promote a healthy gut because it helps feed the good bacteria in your colon.”

8. Overnight Oatmeal: “Overnight oatmeal is easy to make, portable and very nutritious. Oats are high in protein and loaded with many vitamins and minerals. In addition, one serving of 234 grams provides 16% of your recommended daily fiber intake. Oats have been shown to promote fullness in several studies. This is likely due to the combination of healthy fiber and protein.”

9. Egg Muffins: “Egg muffins are a super healthy snack with lots of protein. They’re made by mixing eggs with veggies and seasonings, pouring the mixture into a muffin tin and then baking the muffins. They are also very convenient, as they can be eaten hot or cold. You can increase their nutrient content by making them with veggies and add more protein by topping them with a tablespoon or two of cheese.

This egg muffin recipe combines eggs with broccoli, onions and bell peppers.”

10. Fruit and Nut Bars: “Fruit and nut bars are a crunchy and high-protein snack that can be eaten on the go. They are typically pre-packaged, which isn’t always the healthiest option. However, some brands use natural ingredients without added sugar. KIND Plus bars are a great option in the US. They are known for using simple ingredients such as nuts, dried fruit, and oats in their products.”

These are just ten of the thirty snacks listed in Healthline’s article. Be sure to check the rest out for even more ideas!

An Overview of Unitek EMT

Have you ever wondered, just how long does it take to become an EMT? At Unitek EMT, we strive to prepare aspiring Emergency Medical Technicians by providing them with EMT training and an accelerated EMT program. Experts in the EMS field educate our students through a combination of traditional learning, simulation training, and workshop-style classes.

Our 14-Day Boot Camp1 is currently completed at a facility in Chandler, Arizona. Students can also attend American Heart Association (AHA) CPR courses or a stellar EMT Refresher course. Additionally, a BLS course is also offered at the Chandler facility.

If you’d like more information, please contact us toll free at 888-790-1458.

Learn how to save lives with Unitek EMT!

 

 

 

1 Our 14-Day EMT Program in AZ is taught in an intensive “boot camp” style, to simulate the fast pace of work expected on the job as an EMT. 

Unitek EMT’s Spotlight Series #4

Unitek EMT’s Spotlight Series #4

Unitek EMT’s Spotlight Series #4

While discussing superheroes, Eliezer Yudkowsky once said: “The police officer who puts their life on the line with no superpowers, no X-Ray vision, no super-strength, no ability to fly, and above all no invulnerability to bullets, reveals far greater virtue than Superman—who is a mere superhero.”

In this fourth installment of the spotlight series, we’re going to take a closer look at police officers and detectives. Our information comes directly from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). They are the principal federal agency responsible for measuring labor market activity, working conditions, and price changes in the economy.

First, let’s look at the definition of these professions!

What Is a Police Officer or a Detective?

According to the BLS, “Police officers protect lives and property. Detectives and criminal investigators, who are sometimes called agents or special agents, gather facts and collect evidence of possible crimes.”

Job duties can widely differ depending on the employer, function, and location. However, all police and detectives create reports and keep detailed records. Both of which might be needed if they later testify in court. Additionally, most carry various law enforcement tools; these often include radios, handcuffs, and guns.

What Does a Police Officer or a Detective Do?

The BLS lists the following as tasks typically performed by police officers, detectives, or criminal investigators:

  • Respond to emergency and nonemergency calls
  • Patrol assigned areas
  • Conduct traffic stops and issue citations
  • Search for vehicle records and warrants using computers in the field
  • Obtain warrants and arrest suspects
  • Collect and secure evidence from crime scenes
  • Observe the activities of suspects
  • Write detailed reports and fill out forms
  • Prepare cases and testify in court

In addition, the BLS provides some examples of the types of police officers and detectives that you might come across…

+ Detectives and criminal investigators: “They conduct interviews, examine records, observe the activities of suspects, and participate in raids and arrests. Detectives usually specialize in investigating one type of crime, such as homicide or fraud.”

+ Fish and game wardens: “They enforce fishing, hunting, and boating laws. They patrol fishing and hunting areas, conduct search and rescue operations, investigate complaints and accidents, and educate the public about laws pertaining to the outdoors.”

+ Police and sheriff’s patrol officers: “They are the most common type of police and detectives, and have general law enforcement duties. They wear uniforms that allow the public to easily recognize them as police officers. They have regular patrols and also respond to emergency and nonemergency calls.”

+ Transit and railroad police: “They patrol railroad yards and transit stations. They protect property, employees, and passengers from crimes such as thefts and robberies. They remove trespassers from railroad and transit properties and check IDs of people who try to enter secure areas.”

What Is the Work Environment of a Police Officer or a Detective?

Unitek EMT’s Spotlight Series #4

It really depends on the officer and the environment. Generally speaking, though, there are times when police and detective work can be “physically demanding, stressful, and dangerous.” As the BLS states, “Officers must be alert and ready to react throughout their entire shift. [They] regularly work at crime and accident scenes and encounter suffering and the results of violence. Although a career in law enforcement may be stressful, many officers find it rewarding to help members of their communities.”

Below is a BLS breakdown for the biggest employers of police and detectives:

+ Local government, excluding education and hospitals: 78%

+ State government, excluding education and hospitals: 11%

+ Federal government: 7%

+ Educational services; state, local, and private: 3%

How Do You Become a Police Officer or a Detective?

So, just how do you become an officer or a detective? Let’s start with education! The BLS states that education requirements can range from a high school diploma to a college degree. They also relay that most police officers and detectives “must graduate from their agency’s training academy before completing a period of on-the-job training. Candidates must be U.S. citizens, usually at least 21 years old, and able to meet rigorous physical and personal qualifications.”

If you’re interested in becoming a detective, it’s important to note that detectives usually start their careers as police officers before getting promoted to detective. On the other hand, if you’re interested in a career as an FBI special agent, applicants typically need to have three years of “professional work experience in areas ranging from computer science to accounting.”

According to the BLS, employment of police and detectives is projected to grow 7 percent by 2026. The need for public safety is expected to create more openings for officers, although demand will likely vary depending on location.

An Overview of Unitek EMT

While Unitek EMT does not offer law enforcement training courses, we do offer an accelerated EMT program! As an aspiring officer or detective, you might want to acquire some first aid skills. Experts in the EMS field educate our students through a combination of traditional learning, simulation training, and workshop-style classes. Additionally, we offer a program with several variations to better accommodate our students.

These variations include a 14-Day Boot Camp1 at our facility in Chandler, Arizona, and a Boot Camp at our Fremont Campus in Northern California. In California we offer AHA Basic Life Support (BLS) courses for professionals to learn or recertify for CPR, while others enhance their skillset with our Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) course.

Our Arizona students can attend American Heart Association (AHA) CPR courses or a stellar EMT Refresher course. This course is a combination of the traditional EMT Refresher—it includes all core material—and the NCCP National Registry 20-hour requirements, but it is presented in a 30-hour format. Additionally, a BLS course is also offered at the Chandler facility.

If you’d like more information, please contact us toll free at 888-790-1458.

Learn how to save lives with Unitek EMT!

 

 

1 Our 14-Day EMT Program in AZ and the 14-Day on-ground portion of the EMT Program in CA are taught in an intensive “boot camp” style, to simulate the fast pace of work expected on the job as an EMT. The California EMT Program also includes online instructional hours.

Unitek EMT’s Spotlight Series #3 EMT Training

Unitek EMT’s Spotlight Series #3

Unitek EMT’s Spotlight Series #3 EMT Training

You may have heard of the thin blue line or the thin red line, but have you heard of the gold line? There is a quote commonly found on inspirational signs, in pictures, and saved to various social media platforms. It says this: “Between the thin red line and the thin blue line lies the thinnest gold line. The gold line represents those who are rarely seen but mostly heard. The calm voice in the dark night. Dispatchers, the golden glue that holds it all together.”

In this third installment of the spotlight series, we’re going to take a closer look at police, fire, and ambulance dispatchers, and how they are the calm in the chaos. Our information comes directly from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). They are the principal federal agency responsible for measuring labor market activity, working conditions, and price changes in the economy.

Let’s start by delving into the definition of a dispatcher…

What Is a Dispatcher?

A dispatcher answers both emergency and nonemergency calls for people who need law enforcement, firefighters, ambulatory services, or a combination of the three. To some, they are also known as public safety telecommunicators.

Dispatchers have the difficult task of keeping a cool head under pressure, and providing stability and direction in stressful situations. According to the BLS,Dispatchers must stay calm while collecting vital information from callers to determine the severity of a situation and the location of those who need help. They then communicate this information to the appropriate first-responder agencies.”

Additionally, dispatchers often tell callers what to do before help arrives. Because of this, most dispatchers have been trained to deliver medical assistance over the phone. They might need to help the caller provide first aid while they wait, or they might need to instruct the caller on how they can remain safe. Throughout these calls, dispatchers keep detailed records of their conversations and log important facts.

What Does a Dispatcher Do?

The BLS lists the following as tasks typically performed by dispatchers:

  • Answer 9-1-1 emergency telephone and alarm system calls
  • Determine the type of emergency and its location and decide the appropriate response on the basis of agency procedures
  • Relay information to the appropriate first-responder agency
  • Coordinate the dispatch of emergency response personnel to accident scenes
  • Give basic over-the-phone medical instructions before emergency personnel arrive
  • Monitor and track the status of police, fire, and ambulance units
  • Synchronize responses with other area communication centers
  • Keep detailed records of calls

What Is the Work Environment of a Dispatcher?

Unitek EMT’s Spotlight Series #3 Work Environment

According to the BLS, “Dispatchers typically work in communication centers, often called public safety answering points (PSAPs). Some dispatchers work for unified communication centers, where they answer calls for all types of emergency services, while others may work specifically for police or fire departments.”

The work environment of a dispatcher can be stressful. Some may work long shifts, take numerous calls, and face troubling situations. During certain calls, they will be required to help people in life-threatening situations. The pressure to remain calm while responding quickly can be demanding.

Below is a breakdown for the biggest employers of police, fire, and ambulance dispatchers…

+ Local government, excluding education and hospitals: 80%

+ State government, excluding education and hospitals: 6%

+ Ambulance services: 6%

+ Colleges, universities, and professional schools; state, local, and private: 3%

+ Hospitals; state, local, and private: 2%

How Do You Become a Dispatcher?

So, just how do you become a dispatcher? Let’s start with education! The BLS states that “most police, fire, and ambulance dispatchers have a high school diploma. Many states and localities require dispatchers to have training and certification.”

Plus, candidates usually need to pass a written exam and a typing test. In some situations, applicants might be required to pass a background check. They might also need to pass tests for the following: lie detector, drugs, hearing, and vision. Experience with computers and customer service can be very helpful. Additionally, the ability to speak other languages—particularly Spanish—tends to be desirable in this occupation.

Generally speaking, the training requirements will vary by state. For instance, some states might require 40 or more hours of initial training, while others might require continual training every two or three years. Then there are some states that do not mandate any specific training. To learn more, the BLS recommends looking at the Association of Public-Safety Communications Officials (APCO International). There you’ll find a list of states that require training and certification.

The BLS also notes the following about dispatcher training:

“Training covers a wide variety of topics, such as local geography, agency protocols, and standard procedures. Dispatchers are also taught how to use specialized equipment, such as two-way radios and computer-aided dispatch software. Computer systems that dispatchers use consist of several monitors that display call information, maps, any relevant criminal history, and video, depending on the location of the incident.”

An Overview of Unitek EMT

While Unitek EMT does not offer dispatcher training courses, we do offer an accelerated EMT program! Experts in the EMS field educate our students through a combination of traditional learning, simulation training, and workshop-style classes. Additionally, we offer a program with several variations to better accommodate our students.

These variations include a 14-Day Boot Camp1 at our facility in Chandler, Arizona, and a Boot Camp at our Fremont Campus in Northern California. In California we offer AHA Basic Life Support (BLS) courses for professionals to learn or recertify for CPR, while others enhance their skillset with our Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) course.

Our Arizona students can attend American Heart Association (AHA) CPR courses or a stellar EMT Refresher course. This course is a combination of the traditional EMT Refresher—it includes all core material—and the NCCP National Registry 20-hour requirements, but it is presented in a 30-hour format. Additionally, a BLS course is also offered at the Chandler facility.

If you’d like more information, please contact us toll free at 888-790-1458.

Change your future with Unitek EMT!

 

 

1 Our 14-Day EMT Program in AZ and the 14-Day on-ground portion of the EMT Program in CA are taught in an intensive “boot camp” style, to simulate the fast pace of work expected on the job as an EMT. The California EMT Program also includes online instructional hours.